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Triplanar Hip Flexor Stretch

National Physical Fitness and Sports Month

Triplanar Hip Flexor Stretch


Calling all runners, hikers, desk-workers out there--hip flexor stretching in three different planes is a fantastic way to work out the fascial tissue in the front of the hip! There may be many ways to stretch the hip flexors, and one way may work best for each person or body type. Whatever is the preferred position--lunging, half-kneeling, lying on your back, etc--chances are that the stretch is being performed solely one direction.

It is important, in working to increase functional mobility, to work on the dynamic flexibility of the hip flexors. In order to support the natural lengthening and shortening of the hip flexors in a more realistic and applicable way, I like to use this triplanar method to better simulate the non-linear movement of the body.


Triplanar Hip Flexor Stretch (half-lunge position, follow with arm and gaze)

  1. 10 times in the sagittal plane

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2. 10 times in the transverse plane


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3. 10 times in the frontal plane

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*Tips: activate deep core muscles, slightly tuck tailbone, squeeze glutes

Check out Northwest Wellness’s Facebook page for full video demonstration of the stretches:

https://www.facebook.com/114910992693/posts/10156261222062694?s=1088130113&v=e&sfns=mo






PNW Hiking Recommendations

PNW Hiking Recommendations

As an outdoor enthusiast, I appreciate all the amazing hiking and backpacking areas we have here in the Pacific Northwest. I’ve hiked and camped on many of the trails in Washington, but the possibilities are endless and there’s always more to explore. Here are some of my favorite hikes in the area, starting with my favorite, Colchuck Lake!

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Tiger West 3/Tiger Mtn (local hikes series)

This trail is west of North Bend off I-90 at exit 20. Start up the Bus Trail and then after ¼ mile, veer left onto this trail. This trail is about 6 miles round trip full of switchbacks but well-marked. It took me about 1 ½ hours to go up with a baby in a back pack. It can be steep at times and near the summit is a narrow, steep stretch that once you power through this, you are welcomed by a magnificent view (on a sunny day) of Issaquah, Bellevue, Lake Sammamish and surrounding peaks.  This trail is pretty crowded, is wide and well-marked, and has many leashed dogs along the way. Parking can be difficult in the lot if you go on nice days or the weekends but you can park along the paved road before the entrance. You need the Discover Pass here in the upper parking lot but if you park down lower by the freeway, you don’t need one.

Dr. Harlow at the top of TIger West 3 on Tiger Mountain

Dr. Harlow at the top of TIger West 3 on Tiger Mountain

Dog Friendly Hikes in the Northwest

Two of our most beloved things here at Northwest Chiropractic Center are dogs and hiking.  What a better way to end your summer than to take your furry friends on some lovely walks through our Cascade Mountains. One of our favorites is Mt. Si, located in North Bend, Washington, just a 45 minute drive from Federal way.  Not for the faint of heart, this hike is 4 miles each way and climbs 4,167 feet.  If you bring your dogs along be sure to pack some water and a portable dog dish.  They will definitely need a drink along the way and at the top.

The hike begins at the Mount Si Natural Resources Conservation Area parking lot. It climbs from a low-elevation conifer forest to the vestiges of an old burn, now becoming a new forest of firs. The fire dates back to 1910 when Mount Si burned for weeks.

At 1,600 feet (about a mile) you come to an obvious stopping place, a rocky area with a view to the valley and Interstate 90. Another obvious rest stop is reached at about 1,750 feet with benches. Snag Flats is reached in another 3/4 mile at about 2,100 feet, the only level section of trail you’ll encounter. Just before Snag Flats, a short path descends to a stream, a cool place to rest on a hot day. It is about 2 1/2 more miles to Haystack Basin at about 3,900 feet (four miles total).

There are plenty of good rocky perches and benches below the Haystack. From the base of the Haystack there are views more than 3,000 feet straight down to the valley and I-90, as well as out to the Olympic Mountains and Seattle. The Haystack is a short scramble from there and is moderate class 2/3. In the winter it can be a good mixed/ice climb.

In addition you can find more dog-friendly hikes at http://www.trails.com/activity.aspx?area=13714

Marty and Lucy
Marty and Lucy

Mt. Peak/Pinnacle Peak/Mt. Pete (local hikes series)

Bench dedicated to Jon Nichols at the base of Mt. Peak.

Bench dedicated to Jon Nichols at the base of Mt. Peak.

This trail is about 2 miles round trip and located in Enumclaw around the King County Fairgrounds. It is steep and relatively short (it took me about 1 hour round trip) but offers a good challenge for the muscles and allows you to work up a sweat. The views from the top are not breathtaking, but are a nice reward for climbing up. At the bottom of the trail is a bench that is dedicated to the late Jon Nichols who died in April of 2009 after a courageous battle with cancer. At the top you will find a plaque in memory of his tenacious life.

Little Si (local hikes series)

Dr. Harlow hiking Little Si

Dr. Harlow hiking Little Si

Little Si: This is a fairly easy hike that begins and ends with a moderately steep climb. The Discover Pass is required to park here. This is around North Bend off I-90 at exit 32. The parking here is very difficult seeing it is a popular trail and there is not much parking to begin with. Weekends and sunny days require some luck or starting really early. The trail is 4.4 miles round trip. Along the way climbers are often scaling the rocks near the trail. The summit allows views of the Snoqualmie River Valley and is a great place to enjoy lunch or a snack before heading down. The downside is the terrain on this trail. Especially carrying my baby in the backpack, the rocky surfaces that need to be climbed and trees that need to be maneuvered around make it difficult and sometimes a bit questionable. Otherwise, Little Si is great for those not yet ready for nearby Mt. Si.

Twin Falls (local hikes series)

Twin falls hike

Twin falls hike

This is an easy to moderate trail depending on how far you go and what path you take. I started at the west trailhead off I-90 at exit 34 just east of North Bend. Be aware that you need the Discover Pass to park here. It is mostly wooded so it is a good hike for a hot day. There are many opportunities in the beginning to go down to the South Fork River. You will come across a junction where a right turn will lead you down to the rocks by the river where you can get a beautiful view of the falls. Turning left will put you on a trail that leads to a bridge above the falls. If you continue on for almost a mile more, you will have a moderately difficult hike which leads up to a gravel road. It is a nice hike but the scenery at the top is not too impressive. I did this hike with a baby on my back in a hiking pack and found it to be somewhat tiring but not too hard.