The truth about protein shakes

In all of my years of working in the health field I noticed that people tend to shy away from whey protein powder shakes. With all of the myths out there and the stigma of being associated with big humongous professional bodybuilders I see why people tend to look at it with a dissident eye.

So what is a whey protein? Whey is the excess remains that forms when turning milk into cheese. So what does that have to do with “gaining unnecessary amount of muscle?” It doesn’t have anything to do with that. Many whey protein powders out on the market these days usually have added amino acids, and immune system properties such as immunogoblins, lactoglobulin, and other properties to aid in recovery from vigorous activities.

What does protein do to the body? Protein breaks down to amino acids. Amino acids are very important in the body as they are present in co-enzymes, hormones, immune system, repairing, and other molecules which are essential for life. So depleting your body of protein can cause serious harm to your health.

Many people take whey protein shakes because it’s a convenient way of getting in a quick meal. Rather than having to cook up a chicken or steak, all you have to do is throw in a couple of scoops of protein powder and mix it with water. So you may be wondering, if I drink protein I will either gain a whole bunch of muscle or you’ll get fat. The only way you’ll gain weight is if you’re taking in more calories than you’re burning.  Here’s a short little kids rhyme I may add to whey protein.

Little Miss Muffet
Sat on a tuffet
Eating her curds and whey
Along came a spider
Who sat down beside her
And frightened Miss Muffet away

I highly doubt Little Miss Muffet was a professional bodybuilder looking to put on some weight in her off season. The nice thing about protein is that it can add in weight loss and improve body composition if you coordinate your diet accordingly.